Pensionado Residency for US Citizens with Uncomplicated backgrounds

I had a terrible time getting the true instructions to complete my residency application so I am going to now attempt to help you save a little cash and do the job correct (the first time). First you will need the following documents from your home country; 1) Birth Certificate 2) Police Record (most states will do a 'name only ' police records check through the 'State' Bureau of Investigation. for a small fee. But you M U S T have an Original, a faxed copy; will NOT be accepted, so an original must be mailed to you. 3) Health (report) Certificate (letter) (This does not necessarily have to be an up to date report, (but it must be an Original, not faxed) you can supplement an "older health report" from the last time the doctor saw you, with a Nicaraguan Health Certificate which is up to date and available at no cost for the exam at the local hospital. 4) Marriage License (if applicable) 5) Passport (You must have three copies of each and every page) 6) Proof of income (a Social Security letter from the US Embassy in Managua will suffice, ask at the window when you go for authentication,). {Elena Leon is the woman to talk to.} ( In the past you had to have these authenticated (for lack of a better term) in the US by the Sec. of State in your home state and the US State Dept as well and the Nicaraguan Embassy.) Now you can get on line make an appointment with the U.S. embassy and the embassy will "authenticate" these papers for the United States. (They will rivet the originals together and the document authentication with an embassy embossed stamp, (DO NOT SEPARATE these pages.) When you copy these each separate page must have three copies {copy the top one and fold it over to copy the second, etc.} 7) The other things necessary are a letter you will write stating why you wish to have Nicaraguan residency,( …the climate is great,... the cost of living is more in line with your present income, ...you have many Nicaraguan friends you don't want to leave,...the country is beautiful,… you wish to start a business here, etc.) Put your Direcion (your correct (address)/directions to your house including the barrio) in the letterhead, include your telephone number. {Later in this process, there will be an Intur team that will visit you. They will call you first the day of the interview to let you know they’re coming.} 8) You will also have to go to the local Oficina de Gobernacion, Migration (most municipalities have an office where the locals get their passports) there you will buy for C$ 50 a “Solicitude de Cedula Residencia Extranera”. (Get a fluent Spanish speaking friend to help you fill this out if necessary) {It’s three pages, mostly information taken from the originals listed above along with a little family history and career history}. Next, ‘all’ of the (8 listed above) originals must be translated (if necessary) into Spanish. Then you will need three (3) “copies” of EVERYTHING…..EVERYTHING! (The originals are not copies, they are originals) Then take all of this to a local attorney and have all of the copies “certified that they are true and complete copies of the original”, “I” call this process ‘authentication”. (This should cost somewhere near C$20 to C$50 per certification.) Every ‘copy’ MUST be “authenticated” by the attorney. DO NOT ERASE, WHITE OUT, OR MARK THROUGH, ANYTHING! Be sure to put your mind in gear before you put your hand in motion. Oficina de Migration in Managua will NOT accept any paper that has ‘corrections’, scratch-outs or erasures. Now that you have all of your ducks in a row, take the entire package to Intur in Managua. They will go through it, with you, first (about an hour) then have you take the package to MINREX and have the people there “authenticate” your papers for Nicaragua(about 30 to45 minutes.) Then, you return to Intur, a representative will go through the papers with a fine tooth comb if there are errors she will tell you and you must fix the problem before they will accept the package. >( There is a fee for MINREX authentication, you can go to the bank and stand in line and pay a slightly reduced fee{C$15}, or you can buy receipts, for C$25 from the local ‘hustler’,[for lack of a better term,] just outside the cement wall that you came through to get into the building at MINREX.)< (This was my choice and it went very well.) So you’ve passed the first hurdle, you will be given a two page acceptance letter from Intur and now you wait for from between 4 and 6 weeks for Migration to visit, (after Intur accepts your completed application package,) they will call first and let you know they’re coming, they will ask you and your neighbors some questions. Then you will be sent an email (or called on the phone) and told to go to window 24 at the Main Migration Y Extranera Office in Managua. There they will again go though your papers and if they find everything in order, they will have you go two windows away to the booth where they will take your fingerprint and photo. In about 15 minutes they will call you back to the window and give you, a Residencia Cedula Card (embossed). And you’re done for 5 years. This whole thing is not hard they just want you to cross every ‘T’ and dot every ‘i’, and do it the Nicaraguan way.

Hope this helps, good luck and enjoy Nicaragua, I think it’s great, JUST THE WAY IT IS, if it were to be changed it wouldn’t be Nicaragua. Kind of like a man/woman getting married and then trying to change their partner into the person they wanted them to be instead of accepting them for who they are and loving them for being that way. Yes it’s different, but if you want to live in Miami, please for the rest of us, and for your own happiness, move to Miami. Thankx.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Residency Posts

Each time we have a residency post, we have many comments on how the experience differs this time, and the many reasons why this can occur, so rather than let this happen again, I have renamed it with Atento's permission and have turned off comments.. Susan