Cannabusiness II

It appears that Uruguay has beaten Nicaragua to the punch. In today's AP news on Yahoo, "Uruguay is drawing up plans to sell government-grown marijuana. ... President Jose "Pepe" Mujica ... openly declar(ed) that the drug war has failed. Smoking pot — if not growing and selling it — is already legal in Uruguay, and supplying the weed is a $30 million business, the government said."

Of course, little, poor Nicaragua lay in the shadow of the super-meanie waging the drug war (while US Big Pharma & local governments pump kids full of amphetamines - Ritalin & Adderall.) But, should Nicaraguan ever truly feel they're got a sovereign right to act independently, for their own benefit . . . (Fuggetaboutit - just look at the results of the US drug war in Honduras.)

I intended to add this to two older posts here http://nicaliving.com/node/14676 and my modest proposal of 2007, http://nicaliving.com/node/9826 but they're closed to further comment.

Still just imagine a regular flow of aging/ailing hippies driving down the PanAm for those final puffs in tropical sunshine. And all that revenue pumped into Nicaraguan coffers! (Only aging/ailing rock stars & moguls can afford to fly to Uruguay.)

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Related business

While I have to agree that Pepe is on the right track (and his history is, itself, pretty interesting) I think there is a related business possibility that would also benefit Nicaragua: industrial hemp production. Whether you believe that pot became illegal because industrial hemp was a threat to the then new nylon industry or not, industrial hemp is certainly a very good product that could be easily added to Nicaragua's economy.

Hemp can grow on bad land and produces 4-5 times the biomass as trees. Clothing made from hemp has the advantage of being natural and not using petroleum along with substantial strength and durability over cotton. With the existing clothing production industry in Nicaragua, adding hemp-based products makes sense. Also, unlike the production of synthetic materials, it is relatively easy and inexpensive to get into producing cloth from hemp.

Further, cloth is but one product that can be produced from industrial hemp. Add in everything from hemp oil to rope plus an assortment of food products.