So you think the road to SJDS is bad?

So you think the road to SJDS is bad?

This is what the road looked like in the early 1940s. This photo is from the 1943 book "Grandmother Drives South" by Constance jordan Henley. The book details a husband and wife's driving trip from Rio de Janerio to Cape Horn and then North to the U.S. in an early 1940s olds woody station wagon nicknamed "Oldsie". This photo is titled the road from SJDS to Rivas. A very kitschy read!

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Photo taken from "Grandmother Drives South"

Regarding the abovementioned photo and your comments regarding the book from which it was taken, the trip was not taken by "a husband and a wife." What makes this trip even more astonishing is that it was taken by a widow in her late 50's, and her companion was her nephew -- at least until he was drafted, and forced to return to the States. His place was taken by the son of a Chilean diplomat (so that she would have a companion as no lady should travel that distance alone, especially in strange countries). I know the above to be fact as I am the author's granddaughter, to whom the book was dedicated. I love searching the web for references to my grandmother's book and the travels that led to it. She was so far ahead of her time, but a gracious lady to the end. She died in 1944, en route to a second visit to South America. I was four years of age, but her memory has stayedl with me these many years. I only wish I could be as fearless as she.

Photo taken from "Grandmother Drives South"

Regarding the abovementioned photo and your comments regarding the book from which it was taken, the trip was not taken by "a husband and a wife." What makes this trip even more astonishing is that it was taken by a widow in her late 50's, and her companion was her nephew -- at least until he was drafted, and forced to return to the States. His place was taken by the son of a Chilean diplomat (so that she would have a companion as no lady should travel that distance alone, especially in strange countries). I know the above to be fact as I am the author's granddaughter, to whom the book was dedicated. I love searching the web for references to my grandmother's book and the travels that led to it. She was so far ahead of her time, but a gracious lady to the end. She died in 1944, en route to a second visit to South America. I was four years of age, but her memory has stayedl with me these many years. I only wish I could be as fearless as she.

Photo taken from "Grandmother Drives South"

Regarding the abovementioned photo and your comments regarding the book from which it was taken, the trip was not taken by "a husband and a wife." What makes this trip even more astonishing is that it was taken by a widow in her late 50's, and her companion was her nephew -- at least until he was drafted, and forced to return to the States. His place was taken by the son of a Chilean diplomat (so that she would have a companion as no lady should travel that distance alone, especially in strange countries). I know the above to be fact as I am the author's granddaughter, to whom the book was dedicated. I love searching the web for references to my grandmother's book and the travels that led to it. She was so far ahead of her time, but a gracious lady to the end. She died in 1944, en route to a second visit to South America. I was four years of age, but her memory has stayedl with me these many years. I only wish I could be as fearless as she.

You must feel extremely proud

to have such a wonderful and adventurous grandmother.

Thank you....

for adding the information, your grandmother was quite a woman.

-Doug

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate

Old Woody

I drove my Old Woody over roads almost that bad about 10 years later. I'll see if I can find a picture.

Do you know???

I dont think I will complain about the road again, the road is great.